Africa

Africa

Things to do in morocco

5 Things to do in Morocco

There is so much to do in Morocco. From admiring its beautiful architecture to visiting vibrant bazaars, the country offers both culture and sight seeing.

Below is a list of five things I found most representative of my trip to Morocco.

5. Experience the wind-whirl streets.

16

Most of the Morrocan cities I’ve visited had countless crisscrossing streets. Carts selling fruits and handcrafted jewelry appeared everywhere. It was a hot and enjoyable mess of people, noise, and traffic. While it might be somewhat overwhelming with the number of street vendors wishing to gain you as a customer, the experience was great. Nevertheless, it is extremely easy to get lost, and not the safest for those traveling alone.


4. Drink mint tea for water and enjoy lavish Moroccan breakfasts.

5 things to do in Morocco

Mint tea accompanied breakfast, lunch, and dinner. We drank the overly sweet yet extremely addicting tea everywhere with anyone. The tea didn’t just serve as a symbol of Moroccan cuisine, but it defined the collectivist culture that Morocco happily embraced.

It was a form of relaxation after a day at work, a gesture for welcoming others to one’s lifestyle, a note of appreciation for those around.

Similarly, Moroccan cuisine is an experience. The breakfasts are massive and full of variety. Fresh jam and juice accompanied pastries and bread. Butter, cheese, and olives are some of the many accessories to the table.


3. Live in a riad

5 things to do in Morocco

A riad is a traditional Moroccan house with an interior garden of sorts. They possess the designs of elegant Moroccan establishments. These stays are comfortable and homey. Similar to hotels, a riad provides well-equipped rooms and (usually) a full breakfast. However, unlike hotels, they are homier and less formal. Staying at a riad is like sleeping over at a good friend’s house, with their mother tirelessly serving you coffee and tea. In fact, a number of riads we stayed at are family businesses.

While it can be costly, riads are definitely worth a stay.


2. Ride a camel in the desert and spend a night with Berbers

5 things to do in Morocco

Spending a night in the desert is a must-do in Morocco! The experience was unforgettable. While the 2-hour camel ride may not be the most appealing form of transportation, the serenity of the night sky amid miles and miles of sand should be enticing enough.

Our hosts, a group of Berbers played music and danced in the tent space that was provided for us. We had some of the most delicious couscouses and saw the most beautiful night sky!


1. Visit the bazaars

Bazaars are an enclosed marketplace that houses various vendors and merchants. The range of products is endless. From daily necessities to delicate crafts, there is a lot to see.

I absolutely loved the buzzing of the place. The flows of people walking around admiring others’ handiwork, loads of bargaining between buyers and sellers and the beautiful colors of the merchandise form an animated and lively atmosphere.

Needless to say, bazaars are a key element in Morocco culture. And Morocco really does them well. That is why this is #1 on my Morocco to do list.


Total Cost

For 6 days including ground transportation in and between cities, accommodation at beautiful riads (mini palaces) with half board (breakfast and dinner), excursion in the desert (camel, tents, and entertainment) and transfers to airport, we each paid €200. Considering the amount of traveling, we definitely got a bargain deal!

The rest of the money I spent was in bazaars. I couldn’t resist the temptation of buying souvenirs!

If you’d like to know the tour group I traveled with or have other questions, feel free to shoot me a message! Otherwise, you can read more of my 6-day adventure in Morocco here.

Happy Travels xx

Pin for later reads!


Chefchaouen, blue city in Morocco

A Week in Morocco

To be honest, Africa in my mind has always been a region populated by wild animals and natural habitat. Of course, I knew there’d be cities and urban living. But the thought of a country like Morocco, with its Middle Eastern infused lifestyle, has never crossed my mind.

Morocco has become one of my favorite destinations. With its magnificent architecture, welcoming people and lavish lifestyle, I often miss the days sipping on overly sweet mint tea and jogging around maze-like medinas.


Chefchaouen, Morocco

11025908_10155245712285640_4667570202155026512_o

Chefchaouen is a city north of Morocco. The whole city is in varying shades of blue, a color said to have the magical power of repelling mosquitoes. As the capital city of pot production, it was offered everywhere. People rolled joints in little cafes by the streets and sold them by the bundle.

The city was small. We were able to tour the town within a day and even had time to hike up a mountain for the full view of mismatching blues. While we felt relatively safe in a group of 9, our guide did tell us to be extra cautious at night.


Fez, Morocco

11037277_10155245721380640_8324514589737371694_o

Fez is the oldest of Morocco’s imperial cities, with a medina that extends back to the thirteenth century. From splendid palaces to religious sanctuaries, the city is often called “Mecca of the West.” Its artisans and activities are spread across maze-like bazaars.

We began the day by visiting the Royal Palace of Fez (Dar el Makhzen). While the gardens of the palace have restricted access, the magnificent gates were worth the visit.

After visiting the palace, we were driven across the city towards a view from Fez el-Bali. This ‘old wall’ provides a great view of the whole city. But a tour guide is a highly recommended. The sprawling streets and constant hustle of Fez were really confusing.

8


Merzouga Desert, Morocco

11043249_10203902842559553_317883572303789135_o

There are no words to describe the incredible experience of lounging in the middle of the desert overnight!! The starry nights and light drinks, the Moroccan meal and Barbar talks, loved it thorough and thorough. Despite how cold the night was, it was while worth the chats in the sand.

Following our two-day stay in Fez, We went through the cedar forest, the port of Midelt, Errachidia Reservoir, and the valley of Ziz towards Erfoud, the city to our desert stay.

We weren’t able to stop at every location on the road, but every spot mentioned is a must see. I really can’t stress how different the landscape and weather between the various Moroccan regions can be. At one point, we had mountains full of snow behind us while heading towards eye-distant desert!

10517628_10155245729810640_979828999281665284_o

We spent the fourth night in the middle of the desert with some Berbers. They were happy go-lucky people that drummed and danced with us the whole night.

The night was completed by millions of stars, a bottle of wine, and a tribe of camels dozed a few feet away.

Alas, the February night sky was bone-shattering, so we spent the rest of the night crawled up in sleeping bags on mattresses inside pre-prepared tents.


Ouarzazate Ciudade, Morocco

12

This is where movies like Lawrence of Arabia and The Mummy were filmed. The set is still intact, and there weren’t many tourists around the area. Unfortunately, our itinerary only provided an hour or so here so I didn’t have the chance to go inside.

By mid afternoon, we were on route to Morocco’s crown jewel–Marrakesh.


Marrakesh, Morocco

20

Marrakesh is as lively as you’d think a metropolis can be. It buzzes with life day and night, with thousands of henna artists, hustlers, musicians, tourists and vendors strolling through the old city center.

There was an infinite number of cuisines. The city center provided western cafes, traditional Moroccan tea shops, Chinese, curry, steak, you name it. I’ve always thought that Italy was home to the best pizza, but it definitely has some competition in the markets of Marrakesh.

One of my favorite places was Bari’s Pizza. They are located just at the outskirts of Jemaa El Fna (main square). Their margarita pizzas are amazing :’) Morocco also makes a mean avocado milkshake, which is basically heaven’s gift to earth and a must have!


Total Cost

No need to say, a week in Morocco was definitely not enough. For 6 days including ground transportation in and between cities, accommodation at beautiful riads (mini palaces) with half board (breakfast and dinner), excursion in the desert (camel, tents, and entertainment) and transfers to airport, we each paid €200. Considering the amount of traveling, we definitely got a bargain deal!

The rest of the money I spent was in bazaars. I couldn’t resist the temptation of buying supposed cashmere scarves and cotton shirts.

If you’d like to know the tour group I traveled with or have other questions, feel free to shoot me a message! Or, read my 5 must-dos in Morocco!

Happy Travels xx 

Pin me for later reads!